www.tigergardentractor.com

The Web Site for Tiger Garden Tractor Enthusiasts

 

Model: C100

The mid-50’s saw quite a shift in the garden tractor market. Tiger only had 1 model of offer (model 883) through the early 50’s, There was market demand for both a larger and a smaller tractor design. With the capital that Tiger raised from the success of the 883, they invested heavily in this C100 tractor as their ‘world class’ larger sized garden tractor.

Tiger C100-side view Tiger C100 - front vew

The model C100 was intended to be introduced around 1956. This model was a completely new design from the ground-up. Tiger spared no expense in the development of this tractor. Most every structural support was cast iron (quite a shift in design as the previous models were mostly welded angle iron).

The primary drive components were purchased from higher quality vendors. They choose a Rockford clutch and a Clark Equipment transmission. Both of these were designed for tractors mcuh larger than the C100. This was Tiger’s first tractor with more than 1 geared speeds forward.

The C100 was physically larger than the old model 883 and was far more capable. It was poised to compete with the likes of Economy Power King and John Deere’s Model L. Unfortunately, this tractor did not fare well in the market. The higher cost of the refinements in the design forced a higher market price. Virtually none of these were made beyond the initial prototype production run.

Tiger was forced to discontinue this model shortly after introduction and regroup on the larger tractor front. This put a financial strain on the company as they were heavily invested on the success of this model.

As a collectors note, there seems to be a common theme with a weakness in the design of the front axle casting. Of the few C100's that survive, the majority sport a fatigue crack down the center. My theory is that the wider stance of the C100's front axle was lead to higher stress/loads from turns and uneven ground. The iron casting would evenually work harden and a crack forms. This design issue probably contributed to the C100 never really getting much traction the market.

Key Features of the C100 Series:

C100 Sales Literature Download Link

1955 C100 Price List Download Link

1955 C100 Advertisement Download Link

1955 C100 Announcement Download Link

C100 Envelope Download Link